2020 Round up: experimenting and specialising

This year has been my first complete calendar year of running an editing and translation business full-time, despite having run a part-time business for over five years. Over the year, I figured out my longer-term approach, started to see good results from my marketing, and refocused my website on my specialist areas. Yet back in … Continue reading 2020 Round up: experimenting and specialising

Guest feature: editing LGBTQ+ fiction

This week *cue drum roll* we have the first guest feature on the blog! Those of you familiar with my previous life as a sociologist will know I have a background in LGBTQ activism among football fans in Southeast Europe. For this reason, I was thrilled to learn of an editor, Nick Taylor, who works … Continue reading Guest feature: editing LGBTQ+ fiction

What issues do novice AND experienced academic writers have in common?

Every summer I teach academic reading and writing to international students at a UK university. The students, mostly from Asia with upper-intermediate (roughly B2) English skills, are often struggling with academic writing in English for the first time in their lives. As an academic editor, I see many of the issues they experience come up … Continue reading What issues do novice AND experienced academic writers have in common?

The Long and Short of It: Academic Style for B/C/M/S Speakers Writing in English

The problem of long and unclear sentences frequently comes up in the editing process. Long sentences create numerous problems in English that are not problematic in B/C/M/S, at least partly because of the case system. The case system makes it easier to identify how each noun links to each verb. It also creates a wonderful … Continue reading The Long and Short of It: Academic Style for B/C/M/S Speakers Writing in English

Editing English, academic hierarchies and “native-speaker” bias

There have recently been several articles circulating about peer reviewers chastising academic writers from non-English speaking backgrounds for their use of English. One wonderful reply from an editor argued that peer reviewers should solely judge works on the merits of their arguments. Sorting out the technical proficiency of the English is the editor’s job, and … Continue reading Editing English, academic hierarchies and “native-speaker” bias